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The Concept of Typicity

What is typicity, how do you define the typical nature of something? Blondes are stupid, men are rampant hypochondriacs and women can’t read maps, right? Well, I’m married to a blonde head-teacher (did I mention I’ve got a sore throat?) who is more intelligent than I’ll ever be but she did once take us down the wrong side of a mountain in the Himalayas…

But what about wine, how many wines are truly typical of their place of origin? This is a particularly vexatious topic when one is trying to embed the tell-tale markers of ‘classic’ wines in one’s brain prior to sitting exams. Michael Schuster writes about the defining stylistic traits that separates one region’s wines from another as well as anybody but does that mean he can always divine the subtleties that make Margaux, Margaux and not St. Julien? Margaux is generally more fragrant, more perfumed? Well yes, except of course when it isn’t. What about the vintage, are wines more typical in say Bordeaux in a really good year such as 2010, or are they more representative in a cooler year when you can smell the pungent tang of bell peppers?

This is not just an issue with Old World wines, in fact the scale of many New World ‘appellations’ or viticultural areas is such that to expect any typicity would be foolish. But it is not just geography that has a profound impact on typicity but also that oft forgotten factor; the desire of the wine-maker. This was made abundantly clear when earlier this week I tasted three Chardonnays from Australia. The Yarra Valley, Adelaide Hills and Margaret River are considered ‘cool’ areas of production with Yarra being the coolest of the three and Margaret River the warmest. Yet on tasting, the decisions made in the winery made these wines, however delicious, impossible to place with any surety. Typical!

Yering Station, Chardonnay, Yarra Valley, 2010, 13.5%
Grape: Chardonnay
Winemaking: No or very little malolactic influence, 9 months in barrel.
Note: Leesy with a touch of aniseed adds a little savoury complexity to the nectarine fruit. Bright but not crisp acidity gives the wine requisite line and length.
Price: 1,550NT
Score: 16/20
Available from: finessewines.com.tw 

Shaw & Smith, M3 Chardonnay, Adelaide Hills, 2012, 13%
Grape: Chardonnay
Winemaking: Partial malolactic, 9 months in barrel (but with a greater influence of new oak than the Yering Station)
Note: Pronounced tangerine and nectarine with some toast and yoghurt-like lees influence. Bright and crisp acidity give the wine great definition and the finish is deliciously long. Excellent value.
Price: 1,100NT
Score: 16.5/20
Available from: icheers.tw 

Clairault, Estate Chardonnay, Margaret River, 2010, 13%
Grape: Chardonnay
Winemaking: No obvious malolactic. 9 months in 40% new oak.
Note: Arguably the best of the three with zesty acidity and a struck match/wet wool character that is distinctly Burgundian. Intense, concentrated and nutty, Margaret River’s answer to Mersault.
Price: 2,500NT
Score: 17/20
Available from: finewine.com.tw

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Carmenere, the perfect red for beginners

Whilst sipping my teeth black at Taipei’s Annual ‘Chilean Wine Tour’, I began increasingly to question why Carmenère is not more widely available here in Taiwan. Of all the Bordeaux varieties, it is the most approachable; no other grape from the banks of the Gironde has the softness or the gentle acidity of Carmenère. In the past, when there remained general confusion about what exactly Chile had in her vineyards, much of what we now know was Carmenère, was thought to be Merlot. As a result, the harvesting of this ‘Merlot’ resulted in the production of some wines that tasted rather green and mean. The reason for this being Carmenère’s propensity to ripen that much later than its more famous cousin. Now that Carmenère is being treated as a separate variety and not just Merlot’s sidekick, the incidence of Chilean wines tasting of tomato stalk is much less common. Ripe Carmenère is instead a vinous pleasure; plush, chocolaty and spicy yet it is the low levels of tannin that makes this so suitable for those at the beginning of their red wine journey.

As many will know, I do not overly concern myself with the idea of food and wine pairing but when chilli is involved, and you are curmudgeonly enough to insist on drinking red wine rather than the much more appropriate beer, then you need something with a very gentle tannic impression. In the past I have found success with cheap and cheerful Garnacha from Aragon (Campo de Borja, Carinena, Calatayud). These wines tend towards being both juicy and fruity with the suppleness of tannin that makes them slip over and around chilli’s fire, subtly diminishing the burn without ever extinguishing its own qualities in the process. Carmenère whilst nothing like Garnacha aromatically, has the requisite softness to work well with chilli’s heat.

If the first wine I had ever tasted had been a decent bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon dominant Bordeaux, I feel sure that my fledgling appreciation of red wines would have been stymied, after all, it takes a while for one’s mouth to find the pleasure secreted amongst all that structure. Ripe Carmenère is altogether a more cosseting experience and one that Chile in conjunction with Taiwan’s importers should pursue with gusto.

Chono Single Vineyard Carmenère, Maipo Valley, 2012, 14%
Grape: Carmenère
Winemaking: A long post fermentation maceration (where the wine is left in contact with the grape skins) has given this wine plenty of volume. 12 months in French and American oak
Note: Generous and voluminous, cuddly but not a chubby wine. Peppery – think Piquillo peppers – and ripe, another fine way to introduce yourself to the Reubenesque charms of the variety.
Price: Approx. $20 USD
Score: 15.5/20
Available from: Not currently available in Taiwan

Espino Reserva, Carmenère, Maipo Valley, 2012, 13%
Grape: 89% Carmenère, 11% Cabernet Sauvignon
Winemaking: 8 months in a mixture of different age French oak giving a subtle oak spiciness.
Note: Expressive nose of espresso, mint and warm spices sit happily alongside a generous and supple wine that provides a delicious introduction to the variety.
Price: Approx. $20 USD
Score: 15.5/20
Available from: Not currently available in Taiwan

Viu Manent, El Incidente, Carmenère, Colchagua, 2011, 15%
Grape: 93% Carmenère, 4% Petit Verdot, 3% Malbec
Winemaking: 16 months in 70% new French oak
Note: More famous as the producer of some of Chile’s best Malbec, Viu Manent are more than capable of producing full bodied, rich and intense Carmenère. This has the chocolate and spice one expects alongside some earthy and more alluring dried flower like aromas. Demonstrates that this grape can do expensive well.
Price: Approx. $50 USD
Score: 16/20
Available from: Not currently available in Taiwan

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Bordeaux 2011

Following on from Wednesday’s missive that discussed the merits or otherwise of Bordeaux 2012, fate guided me to an unexpected comparison with 2011. Taiwan is great, but awash with fellow MW wannabes it is not. Finding ways to prepare for my second attempt at the practical exam that looms large this June, relies on me being creative. My latest plan involves the Taiwan Wine Academy, who, being extremely generous as always, have agreed to send me six samples a week from wines they use in some of their classes. I had my first delivery on Wednesday night, the small brown phials arrived alone and by taxi, carefully cosseted in giant bubble wrap and accompanied by nothing more than a sealed envelope marked ‘Answers’.

Having set my timer for one hour, seven minutes and thirty seconds (MW exams consist of double this quantity of wine and time) I scribbled myself a range of MW style questions, including a requirement to identify the vintages, poured the wines and off I went. Having nosed my way through the six wines that consisted of two whites, three reds and a sweet, it was instantly apparent that they were from Bordeaux. I’d be lying if I said that I knew that the sweet wine was from 2011 and although I was confident that the whites were indeed from this vintage it was the reds that spoke loudest of their birth-year. Being bookended by the markedly richer vintages of 2009 and 2010 on one side and the leaner tasting 2012 on the other, the youthful, still purple hued, ripe but not bumptious nature of the fruit in these 2011’s was transparent.

After 2009 and 2010, the lack of enthusiasm within the wine world to splash the cash on the good but not great vintage that followed, has led many to discount the merits of this more precocious year. Yet 2011 is classic Bordeaux with many wines providing delicious drinking now and over the medium-term. Overall, choosing between 2011 and 2012, is a no-brainer; give me ripeness over greenness any day.

Below are three of the very representative examples tasted from the 2011 vintage.

Chateau Pessac La Garde, Pessac Leognan, 2011, 13%
Grape: 60% Sauvignon Blanc, 40% Sauvignon Gris
Wine-making: 10 months in French oak
Note: Sweet oak, aniseed aromas and citrus peel dominate. This has real drive and minerality with a supporting seam of high acidity.
Price: 1,950NT
Score: 16/20
Available from: www.finese.com.tw 

Chateau d’Issan, Margaux 3eme Cru, 2011, 13%
Grape: 69% Cabernet Sauvignon, 31% Merlot
Wine-making: 18 months in French oak
Note: Heady with the scent of hyacinths, this is classic Margaux with an open and approachable texture that flatters yet has the requisite silky and fine grained tannins that promise continued positive evolution until the early 2020’s.
Price: 2,200NT
Score: 17/20
Available from: Chateau Wine and Cigar 

Chateau de Fonbel, Saint Emilion Grand Cru, 2011, 13.5%
Grape: 63% Merlot, 20% Cabernet Sauvignon, 10% Petit Verdot and 7% Carmenere
Wine-making: 10 months in 30% new French oak
Note: Blackberry and exotic spice, thick tannins and with an opulence that made me think this was Pomerol, this is great value St. Emilion.
Price: 1,150NT
Score: 16/20
Available from: New Century Wine

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Let Them Breathe

One of the most annoying aspects of social media is the constant reminder that people are drinking not only better wine than me but also more mature examples. Here in Taiwan my only storage is my wine fridge that allegedly holds 66 bottles but in reality shoehorning the contents of four cases of wine into its meagre maw is the best I have managed. The result is that wine does not get much chance to mature; such is the rapid turnover of bottles. Therefore the only old wine I get to drink is other people’s, or wine that I make old myself.

It is illuminating to realise just how easy it can be to experience a wine’s future development in bottle, today. Three wines that I opened with my tasting group on Tuesday of last week were perfect examples, the oldest being from 2009 and the others from 2010. One of them in particular the Podere Sapaio from Bolgheri (reviews below) was classy but demure on Tuesday, slightly more alluring on Wednesday and positively rambunctious by Thursday. The Clos Marsalette also opened up, progressively becoming more tobacco and fruitcake scented over those 48 hours. The Domus Aurea from the upper Maipo in Chile was the Dorian Gray of the line-up seemingly oblivious to the ravages of sitting on ullage in my kitchen. It remained very primary and pure with the pointed tang of fresh blackcurrants as dominant on the first day as it was on the third.

There is no doubt that having the facility to store more, or indeed having the money to buy mature is the ideal scenario for winos (should that be wine lovers?) everywhere. Yet the reality is rarely so convenient so open some wine, drink it over two or three days and take a peak into the future.

Podere Sapaio, ‘Volpolo’, Bolgheri, 2010, 13.5%
Grape: 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 15% Merlot, 15% Petit Verdot
Wine-making: 14 months in both large and small French oak barrels
Note: By the third day this was rich in black cherry, vanilla and graphite aromas. The firm and grainy tannins of day one had not altered much in texture but they appeared more voluminous. This is fine stuff and one for Bordeaux lovers who fancy a change.
Price: 2,500NT
Score: 17/20
Available from: www.ascentway.com.tw 

Clos Marsalette, Pessac Leognan, 2010, 13.5%
Grape: 50% Cabernet Sauvignon, 45% Merlot, 5% Cabernet Franc
Wine-making: Matured in 50% new French oak
Note: Exuberant strawberry nose matured to more sweet tobacco and fruitcake by day three. Plush and plump and with ripe, grainy tannins, this is not the most complex Bordeaux you will ever drink but is crowd pleasing in its generosity.
Price: 1,450NT
Score: 16.5/20
Available from: www.winesymphony.com

Vina Quebrada de Macul, Domus Aurea, 2009, 14%
Grape: 85% Cabernet Sauvignon, 7% Merlot, 6% Cabernet Franc & 2% Petit Verdot
Wine-making: 18 months in 80% new French oak
Note: Incredibly pure and precise with brightness of both fruit expression and acidity making this delicious drinking now whilst promising a potential decade of further improvement. Very good.
Price: 1,800NT
Score: 17/20
Available from: www.icheers.tw

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A Date with Louis Jadot

Last year I wrote a piece entitled ‘Boring pinot Noir’ that received more views and comments that any other post since. The general consensus of opinion was how dare I criticise Pinot. It is that kind of grape, one that generates a fanatical following from those that have been seduced by its perfumed and ethereal charms.

I never actually said that all Pinot was boring, just that the grape needed help to be great. Luckily for me I was invited this Sunday to taste a flight of ten wines, all from the 2004 vintage, from one of Burgundy’s most significant producers: Louis Jadot. This large producer has such extensive holdings that it is possible to enjoy the luxury of tasting wines from across the region and from many of the most prestigious vineyards. This, allied to the knowledge that the winemaking employed by Jadot varies little from village to village, ensures that the differences one tastes are a result of site. Nowhere was this more apparent than when trying some of the best of Gevrey Chambertin. We had five wines from this village including Les Cazetiers, Lavaux Saint Jaques and Clos Saint Jaques (all 1er cru) followed by Charmes and Chapelle Chambertin, both Grand Cru. What I had hoped would be obvious were the differences between these wines, differences in intensity, concentration, tannic power and their maturity; I was not disappointed.

I will not bore you with a blow by blow account of each wine’s every nuance (there are tasting notes below) but there are certain points that are worthy of comment. Clos St. Jaques is considered to be the best of Gevrey’s premier crus and one could taste why. This had the stuffing, for another five years improvement whilst the Les Cazetiers (arguably the next best 1er cru in the hierarchy) was perfect now, virile and delicious but a touch more evolved. The Lavaux was, if anything, just past its best, all secondary aromas and more savoury. This was a great advert for the hierarchy of Burgundy, demonstrating with aplomb that vineyards within the same village can be markedly different. Pinot like this is never boring.

Below are the notes on the five Gevrey wines.

Gevrey-Chambertin 1er Cru Lavaux-Saint-Jacques 2004
Grape: Pinot Noir
Winemaking: No stems, long cuvaison, 18-20 months in oak
Note: Usually considered less age-worthy than the Les Cazetiers and Clos St. Jaques and this proved to be exactly the case here. Notes of soy, leaf mould and spice made this the most evolved wine of the flight. Still hanging on but best to be drunk this year.
Price: 4,080NT
Score: 16/20
Available from: Winebay 02 2733 3303

Gevrey-Chambertin 1er Cru Les Cazetiers 2004
Grape: Pinot Noir
Winemaking: No stems, long cuvaison, 15 months in oak
Note: Jasper Morris MW again describes this vineyard as being an exceptional 1er Cru. Virile and more scented than either the other two premier crus, this would be the one that I would most want to drink now and over the next couple of years whilst the Clos St. Jacques continues to develop.
Price: 4,500NT
Score: 17.5/20
Available from: Winebay 02 2733 3303

Gevrey-Chambertin 1er Cru Clos Saint-Jacques 2004
Grape: Pinot Noir
Winemaking: No stems, long cuvaison, 18-20 months in oak
Note: Jasper Morris MW describes this as an exceptional 1er cru or grand cru and this tasted like it was exactly that. Greater depth and profundity than the other two 1er Cru’s with plenty of life ahead of it. Persistent and delicious.
Price: 7,290NT
Score: 17.5-18/20
Available from: Winebay 02 2733 3303

Charmes-Chambertin Grand Cru 2004
Grape: Pinot Noir
Winemaking: No stems, long cuvaison, 18-20 months in oak
Note: Considered the weakest of Gevrey’s Grand Crus due to its size (30ha when both Mazoyeres and Charmes are added together) and thus can be inconsistent. This was excellent with the most alluring aromas of all the wines here. Very floral and iris scented with exotic Chinese medicine and just the beginnings of some leafy more evolved aromas. Splendid. Price: 6,500NT
Score: 18/20
Available from: Winebay 02 2733 3303

Chapelle-Chambertin Grand Cru 2004
Grape: Pinot Noir
Winemaking: No stems, long cuvaison, 18-20 months in oak Note: Situated below Clos de Beze on very sparse soil. This was the most backward but also the wine with the greatest concentration and the finest tannins. Still with a way to go before it is at its peak but after two hours in the glass the perfume, suggesting what is to come with more time in bottle, had become much more pronounced. Excellent
Price: 8,800NT
Score: 18/20
Available from: Winebay 02 2733 3303

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Red Burgundy: Defining the villages of the Cote d'Or

If one exists it is not in my possession. Wine professionals love Burgundy…well most of them. If this article was about white Burgundy I would feel much happier. The great Chardonnays, even the good ones of this region, have the power to engage usually satisfy and occasionally move me. But when it comes to the red version, I find myself wrestling with quality levels, village traits and the determining of maturity, far more so than with any other classic area of production.

Last week, I attended a Burgundy wine-fair in Taipei in an effort to help my understanding reach a greater level of coherency; unfortunately I am no better off than before. There are certain villages that in comparison to others really (ok, usually) do stand out. The delicacy and charm of Chambolle Musigny echoes a similar feeling in the wines of Volnay. The power and exotic spice/chinese medicine nose of Corton, the sumptuousness of Vosne Romanée and the muscularity or tension in the best Gevrey Chambertin. But what about the rest? Marsanny, Fixin, Morey-St-Denis, Vougeot, Pernand Verglesses, Savigny-lès-Beaune, Chorey-lès-Beaune, Monthélie, St-Aubin and Santenay, I know that I cannot accurately gauge the differences between these. The keen-eyed amongst you will notice that I have not mentioned either Pommard or Nuits St. Georges. These were two AOC’s that I have tended to lump together having found their tannic structures somewhat similar; a bit four-square, granular even rustic. Jasper Morris MW, someone who has probably forgotten more about Burgundy than the entirety of my knowledge on the subject, compares Pommard with Gevrey Chambertin – but I don’t really feel this comparison (isn’t Gevrey usually more fine, more floral?). I prefer Remington Norman’s assertion that Nuits with its ‘robust charms of leather and denim are often no less alluring than the soft elegance of silk and satin.’ This makes sense to me and I could utilise this description for Pommard as well.

Below are two wines from Pommard and Nuits that on tasting were delicious although frustratingly as much about silk as they were denim. My conclusion? Bollocks!

Domaine Parent, Pommard, Les Chaponnières 1er Cru, 2010, 13%
Grape:
Pinot Noir
Wine-making: 40% new French oak
Note: Exotically scented, red fruits, fresh and with firm but fine tannins, this is a wine that exudes class. Delicious now but somewhat a waste not to give it at least another 5 years to really fully integrate.
Price: Globally approximately $100 USD
Score: 17.5-18/20
Available from: Not currently available in Taiwan

Domaine des Clos, Nuits-Saint-Georges, Les Crots 1er Cru, 2012, 13.5%
Grape:
Pinot Noir
Wine-making: A small portion of new French Oak
Note: Again this is firm but only in the virile sense. Still too young to be sensuous but with great promise for the future, no rusticity here. Some primary plummy fruit, exotic spice and violet character definitely worth getting hold of a few bottles to celebrate 2020 when it gets here.
Price: Globally approximately $50, a bit of a bargain
Score: 17/20
Available from: Not currently available in Taiwan

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Something for the Weekend 11: Merlot

Poor old Merlot. Even before Miles spat the now infamous ‘I am not drinking any fucking Merlot’ in Sideways, this variety was rarely spoken about with love and affection. Yet this is the second most widely planted wine grape in the world so why the lack of respect? Well some of it comes down to the promise (real or not) that the likes of Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir can deliver a more thrilling wine experience. Hmmm. Whilst this may be true (lovers of Pomerol look away now) too often it is a fallacy. I have spent far too much time, effort and money, hunting for that elusive bottle of Burgundian Pinot Noir that will make me cry like a baby as it reveals its haunting and ethereal charms. Equally, varietal Cabernet Sauvignon is often anything but charming, all edges and bones with a hole in its middle where the guts should be. No, Merlot is more the girl (or boy) next door, with flesh, sweet perfume and an alluring curve to the belly.

With this in mind I chose seven Merlot dominant wines to taste blind (or semi-blind in my case) with some of my students and sommeliers of Taipei. All the wines were of good if not superb quality and represented regions as diverse as Napa and Walla Walla in the States, Pomerol and St.Emilion in Bordeaux as well as Bolgheri (Italy), Hawkes Bay (New Zealand) and Stellenbosch (South Africa). Below are the three wines that I felt best-demonstrated Merlot’s comeliness.

Chateau La Dominique, St.Emilion Grand Cru Classé, 2009, 14.5%
Grape:
86% Merlot, 12% Cabernet Franc, 2% Cabernet Sauvignon
Wine-making: 70% new French oak
Note: Meaty, ripe blackberry and with just enough tobacco savouriness to add some complexity, this is concentrated and full bodied if a little hefty to be considered elegant. Enjoyable and should improve over the coming decade.
Price: 2,200NT
Score: 16.5/20
Available from: icheers.com.tw

L’Ecole No 41, Estate Merlot, Walla Walla (Washington), 2008, 14.5%
Grape:
80% Merlot, 10% Cabernet Franc, 10% Cabernet Sauvignon
Wine-making: 40% new French oak
Note: Developed in the glass to reveal both red and dried fruit, vanilla and a concentration that hinted at a warmer climate. The tannins remain firm (more old-world in style) but this has a certain charm that will again reward patience over the next five years.
Price: 2,500NT
Score: 16.5/20
Available from: icheers.com.tw

Clos du Val, Napa Valley Merlot, 2010, 13.5%
Grape:
85% Merlot, 7% Cabernet Sauvignon, 4% Cabernet Franc, 4% Petit Verdot
Wine-making: 25% new French oak
Note: My favourite of the seven wines tasted and the third cheapest. Tutti-frutti nose always brings to mind the West Coast of America. This has just enough of everything; up-front fruit, tannin, spice, body and persistence to achieve a harmonious and satisfying whole.
Price: 1,700NT
Score: 17/20
Available from: icheers.com.tw

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Something for the Weekend 9: The effectiveness of Blind Tasting

Blind tasting is controversial. As an importer it was the final and most critical part of my selection process. Having spent time visiting producers and tasting wines in situ; it was only on my return home that a reliable assessment could be made. The blind-tasting of wines of a particular price point or region against their neighbours or competitors, helped remove some of the bias to which I was prone. I never bought wines from people I didn’t like but blind tasting also prevented me from buying wines from people I really did. It removed the emotion and romanticism I might have attached to people and places and left the raw product exposed for what it was. It is this reason why so many returning from holiday clutching their favourite wine of the trip end up being disappointed. Most wine tastes good when the sun is high and the serotonin is flowing. In the more prosaic surroundings of home, these same vinous ‘joys’ are often much less rewarding.

In the classroom, blind-tastings are frequently used as a method of torture rather than one of learning. There should always be a clear reason as to why one is tasting blind otherwise it becomes a game with too many crestfallen ‘losers’ and no real ‘winner’ – not in an educational sense anyway. Last Sunday my class enjoyed a flight of four wines (conducted blind), that worked particularly well as an exercise in varietal differences. Attempting to ‘bench-mark’ varieties or regional expressions of certain grape types is not always successful, but the Syrah, Carmenere, Malbec and Cabernet/Merlot we tasted proved deliciously up to the task. As an MW student I am keenly aware of making tastings illuminating and relevant; and these four wines, none prohibitively expensive, are worthy of some home study of your own.

Marques de Casa Concha, Syrah, D.O Buin (Maipo), Chile, 2011, 14.5%
Grape:
Syrah
Wine-making: 18 months in French Oak
Note: Classic Syrah. Blackberry fruit and fresh acidity that helps preserve this wine’s sense of purity. The oak does not get in the way and the ripe tannins complete the harmonious palate. Good value
Price: 1050NT
Score: 17/20
Available from: Creationwines.com.tw

Marques de Casa Concha, Carmenere, D.O Peumo (Rapel), Chile, 2011, 14%
Grape:
Carmenere
Wine-making: 18 months in French Oak
Note: There is a little pleasant herbaceousness here but no under-ripeness that can leave Carmenere feeling green and mean. Chocolatey and supple tannins with a touch of spice from the oak.
Price: 950NT
Score: 16.5/20
Available from: Creationwines.com.tw

Catena Alta, ‘Historic Rows’, Malbec, Mendoza, Argentina, 2009, 14%
Grape:
Malbec
Wine-making: 18 months in French oak
Note: It is rare for me to drink any one wine more than a couple of times a year but this is one of the few I could happily have a glass of every day. It smells of cherry pie, vanilla, citrus peel and has silky, super-fine tannins. Persistent and delicious, exceptionally good.
Price: 2400NT
Score:18.5/20
Available from: icheers

Cape Mentelle, Cabernet Sauvignon/Merlot, Margaret River, Australia, 2012, 13.5%
Grape:
63% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot, 5% Petit Verdot, 2% Cabernet Franc
Wine-making: 14 months in 20% new French oak
Note: Mint, chocolate and tar (three of my favourite smells) accompanied by a structure of fine-grained tannins help give this wine more than just a sheen of elegance. Very good value.
Price: 1200NT
Score: 17/20
Available from: P9.com.tw

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